Review: Amarone Leksikon app

Amarone della Valpolicella is a pretty successful wine all over the world, but having to deal with its many vintages in the market can be challenging. Is 2012 one better than 2014 or 2011 is the right one? Obviously, you can surf among the plenty of reviews on the web, reading tons of articles or posts about the vintages, but eventually, the final choice is yours: and what if you are in hurry? What if you have not all that time to inform yourself, and seemingly nobody is able to help you?

Well, actually there are at least 3 solutions to this problem.

The first one: have a look here... ;-)

Second solution: drop a line to us!  Write an email about your doubts about Amarone, and we’ll do our best to reply very quickly.

Third one: if you are just interested  to know more about some vintage in the last 10-15 years, downloading the Amarone Leksikon app might be a good idea.

The author, Bo Axman, has been an Amarone-lover for years. This app is the digital version of his book with the same title: here he gathered information about all the Amarone wines in the market - or at least all those he has been able to find - so in a glimpse you can have all the details you need: what grapes the wine is made with, who is the producer, where the winery is, etc. Most importantly, depending on the winery you are interested, you can have a score about some vintage of their Amarone - and writing yours, too. You can find the wine you are looking for, searching it by the label or the producer’s name. The wines are listed in alphabetical order.

The app is limited so far - there are currently more than 850 labels - because each and every year new producers enter the market, but it’s a good start anyway. Furthermore, the app is regularly updated.

You can download the app for your preferred smartphone here in the iOS Apple App Store or in the Android Google Play Store. The app is free, but it offers in-app purchases. 

 

Updated: 9 facts about Valpolicella that you probably know wrong

If you are a Valpolicella wine lover, it's likely you know many things about this area and its wines. And it's also likely that some of those things are incorrect or totally wrong...

Here we try to correct some of the most common misconceptions about Valpolicella wines.

Harvest 2015 and a recommended reading

Harvest 2015 and a recommended reading

Afterwards a quite difficult vintage, this 2015 harvest in Valpolicella looks a lot better, mainly for the red grapes. If 2014 has been claimed by the producers (in Verona area) as “a vintage for white wines”,  2015 is a “red wines vintage” definitely. 
The 2015 vintage is quite similar to 2007 -  the Consortium Valpolicella says - The wines will be structured, full-bodied and alcoholic (15-16° Vol.)”...

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Amarone della Valpolicella Classico "Vigneti Di Jago" - A Vertical Tasting

Amarone della Valpolicella Classico "Vigneti Di Jago" - A Vertical Tasting

Making wine is often a hard task, a game of balance between opposite strengths: technical issues, legal requirements, personal knowledge and vision, local culture, international taste, marketing trends...

And climate. Too often we underestimate this detail, but  in viticulture it is among the most important element everywhere in the world. No doubts that climate in Valpolicella nowadays is rather different than in the past, and that viticulture has had to adapt itself to those changes.

Consequently, now the wines are different than in the past decades -not to mention other reasons more related to the technique or the customers' taste, of course- although the winery style may be the same at the time (or trying to be).

In the last Vinitaly, the Cantina "Valpolicella"  di Negrar organized a quite interesting vertical tasting of its recent best vintages - 2008, 2005, 2003, 2000, 1997 - of the most important Amarone della Valpolicella: the cru "Vigneti di Jago". Daniele Accordini, the general manager and winemaker, showed us some charts and data about the climate in those vintages - sunlightining, rains, flowering time and other data - explaining how the practices of their viticulture and the winemaking process are adapting themselves and trying to correctly interpret  the natural trends, in order to not distort the final result and support their usual style...

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Flash: Roccolo Grassi adds his "no" to Amarone in 2014

Marco Sartori, owner at Roccolo Grassi

Marco Sartori, owner at Roccolo Grassi

The unfortunate 2014 vintage collects another winegrower of Amarone and Valpolicella wines, Roccolo Grassi, that announces giving up to produce Amarone della Valpolicella 2014. Marco Sartori, the owner, revealed he anticipated the news privately to a friend early at the end of August, and yesterday, Saturday 13th, he made it publicly on Facebook (link in Italian). Roccolo Grassi adds himself to the growing list of Amarone producers that did the same choice like Romano Dal FornoBertani and others smaller producers like Terre di Pietra and Tenute Ugolini.

On the same topic, please see our pre-harvest report and this post about the difficult decisions facing Valpolicella producers.

Harvest 2014, Valpolicella producers lower grape quantity for Amarone

Harvest 2014, Valpolicella producers lower grape quantity for Amarone

In a dramatic development following some recent anticipations about a very difficult harvest in Valpolicella (see our report), we learnt that Consorzio Tutela Valpolicella (the organization representing local wine bottlers, cooperatives, wine producers and winegrowers), decided to lower from 50% to 35% the amount of grapes to be reserved for the drying process for the production of Amarone  2014.

Due to a month and a half of heavy rain, hail storms and excessive soil humidity, the health of grapes seems to be undermined almost everywhere in Valpolicella, with the exception of some hills exposed to local fresh winds (for more details, please read our report here)...

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“Amarone is becoming fantastically popular (and cheap). Is it a problem?”

“Amarone is becoming fantastically popular (and cheap). Is it a problem?”

In a recent article on his BKWine Magazine, our good friend Per Karlsson deals the interesting question of cheaper Amarone della Valpolicella (mainly) in the Swedish market.

The point is that, due to the appassimento or ripasso technique (two different techniques that a #winelover has to learn to distinguish), almost any red wine can become sexier: velvety, sweeter sometimes, much more structured, fruity, powerful etc. In a word, more exciting. The perfect wine to impress everybody, don’t you agree? I mean, everybody who never tasted an authentic Amarone della Valpolicella before… because if you know this kind of wine, you also know that the technique is just a part of its success - this is not the moment to discuss also about this, though...

Read More

9 facts about Valpolicella that you probably know wrong

If you are a Valpolicella wine lover, it's likely you know many things about this area and its wines. And it's also likely that some of those things are incorrect or totally wrong...

Here we try to correct some of the most common misconceptions about Valpolicella wines.