Updated: 9 facts about Valpolicella that you probably know wrong

If you are a Valpolicella wine lover, it's likely you know many things about this area and its wines. And it's also likely that some of those things are incorrect or totally wrong...

Here we try to correct some of the most common misconceptions about Valpolicella wines.

Harvest 2015 and a recommended reading

Harvest 2015 and a recommended reading

Afterwards a quite difficult vintage, this 2015 harvest in Valpolicella looks a lot better, mainly for the red grapes. If 2014 has been claimed by the producers (in Verona area) as “a vintage for white wines”,  2015 is a “red wines vintage” definitely. 
The 2015 vintage is quite similar to 2007 -  the Consortium Valpolicella says - The wines will be structured, full-bodied and alcoholic (15-16° Vol.)”...

Read More

Winerist: 3 Top Wineries in Valpolicella

About_Winerist_-_Winerist.jpg

We are happy and honored to announce a new important contribution and partnership with Winerist.com, the 2014 Best Travel Website. Winerist is an interesting and informative website for people all around the world who love travelling and exploring new experiences in the wine world: it  provides you suggestions and tips for your next wine destination. We'll contribute writing about Valpolicella, its territory, events, wineries and wines. Here you can find the beginning of our first post... 

"Never been to Valpolicella? If you are a wine lover, sooner or later you’re going to have to visit this area in the Veneto wine region, where the famous wines Amarone della Valpolicella and Valpolicella Ripasso are made. 

Valpolicella stretches 25km from west to east and 12km from north to south. The city of Verona is found in the south in the middle of a complex system of valleys that flow from north (Monti Lessini) to south. The Adige River limits Valpolicella in its western and southern sides. 

Usually, we divide Valpolicella into three parts: the historical part, called “Valpolicella Classica”, the Valpantena valley in the middle and the eastern part called “Valpolicella Doc” or “Big Valpolicella”, because its extension is bigger. In all of these more than 2 hundred wineries are found; most of them are family-run, in nice buildings more or less old, but some of them are quite interesting because they are hosted in ancient manors…".

(read the post here)

“Amarone is becoming fantastically popular (and cheap). Is it a problem?”

“Amarone is becoming fantastically popular (and cheap). Is it a problem?”

In a recent article on his BKWine Magazine, our good friend Per Karlsson deals the interesting question of cheaper Amarone della Valpolicella (mainly) in the Swedish market.

The point is that, due to the appassimento or ripasso technique (two different techniques that a #winelover has to learn to distinguish), almost any red wine can become sexier: velvety, sweeter sometimes, much more structured, fruity, powerful etc. In a word, more exciting. The perfect wine to impress everybody, don’t you agree? I mean, everybody who never tasted an authentic Amarone della Valpolicella before… because if you know this kind of wine, you also know that the technique is just a part of its success - this is not the moment to discuss also about this, though...

Read More

9 facts about Valpolicella that you probably know wrong

If you are a Valpolicella wine lover, it's likely you know many things about this area and its wines. And it's also likely that some of those things are incorrect or totally wrong...

Here we try to correct some of the most common misconceptions about Valpolicella wines.

Do you really know how Amarone della Valpolicella is made?

Do you really know how Amarone della Valpolicella is made?

It's among the most renowned wines of the world, and maybe you also are a lover of this red wine, so elegant, velvety, fruity and powerful... yes, I'm talking about Amarone della Valpolicella. I guess that everybody knows how it is made... no?

The truth is that many wrong beliefs are widespread in the world about this wine: too many people, for example, still believe that the typical blend of grapes is Corvina, Rondinella, Molinara...

Read More